Intervista a Laurie Notaro (english version)

Laurie Notaro gave MRS some inputs about her life and her book “Autobiography of a Fat Bride”

di Silvia Menini

Pubblicato giovedì, 21 ottobre 2010

Rating: 5.0 Voti: 2
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Courtesy of Edizioni Piemme
What does it mean for you being a writer?
It means that today, I don’t have ask people if they want mustard and ketchup on their hot dogs, touch an old lady’s boobs to fit her for a bra or sell someone a worthless special lens coating for a pair of eyeglasses, all stuff that I’ve done before. It means that I get to do what I love to do, and hopefully that in that process; I get to make people laugh. It means that whenever I do a stupid thing or something humiliating happens to me, I know that somewhere down the line, I can hopefully turn that burn of embarrassment into something someone will find funny.
 
What's the best thing about being a writer? What's the worst thing?
The best thing is that I get to work at home and not share a bathroom with anyone I’m not married to. The worst thing is that I only get paid three or four times a year, which can be scary. Not as scary as old lady’s boobs, but pretty scary.
 
What is a novel for you?
A novel is something that is going to swallow me up and make me forget where I am and that I’m laying down on a couch full of dog hair. I love a novel that can take me to another place, introduce me to new people and throw me right into the middle of that story. A good novel will make me want to keep reading, even when my favorite trashy TV show comes on. An excellent novel will make me miss a good eBay auction.

When did you realize for the first time to be talented in writing?
Oh, I will never cop to being talented. I like to tell stories, I have fun doing it. I’m terrible at math, and I can’t put a puzzle together. I needed to learn to be better at something aside from essential life skills like balancing a checkbook or putting a bookshelf together.
 
Regular/steady or precarious? (as a state of mind)
None of the above. Neurotic, catastrophic tendencies. I wake up believing I’m going to die every morning.  If I had my way, I’d run around screaming at least once a day.
 
The book and the Author of your life (your favorite one)
When I was little, I read a lot of Laura Ingalls Wilder. She wrote the “Little House” books about her pioneer family in the late 1800’s. They were books that were so good they made me want to write, too.

What is your relationship with politics?
Terrible. I take politics far too personally. I always want everyone to do the right thing, and most of the time, that never happens.  I almost ran for city council in the town where I live, but realized that if I won, I’d have to see everyone I hated every single day and pretend to be nice to them. But some of them cried at city council meetings, so you really can’t blame me for that. So I changed my mind.
 
What is your relationship with religion?
The same as with politics. It’s tricky business. I’ve reconsidered running for the Pope.

Television news, newspaper or internet as a source of information?
All of them—it’s never bad to get as much information from different sources and them make up your own mind about them. I was a journalist for a long time, and one thing that I learned in working for newspapers, magazines and one of the first newspapers that went online was that anybody can shape a story to say whatever they want. It’s up to the reader to look at everything critically and make the best and most well-informed decision they can. I think being misinformed is far worse than being uninformed.

What does it mean for you to have a child in 2010?
I have a dog. I love having a dog in 2010. There are cuter clothes for her to wear than say, 2005, and better food for her to eat, although I do make most of her food and her snacks.

One project for the future
I’m writing a pilot for a TV show. It’s hard work, but I’m having a wonderful time doing it and I am working with fantastic people.
 
One dream?
To get my TV show on the air. It would be so fantastic I can’t even imagine it.
 
Any advice for whom would like to follow your example?
Yes!! Have a back up plan. Learn to like selling hot dogs, touching old boobs or selling fake coating on glasses. It will always come in handy and let you sleep at night when your bank account is going dry. People who want to be writers also need to remember that the most important thing is to write for yourself, and not for anyone else. Follow your gut. Trust your instincts. No one else’s name is on your work, and if someone is going to call you out for sucking, it had better be your idea that sucked and no one else’s. Also, it is important to be tenacious. Time and place (and luck) is everything. Talent is a beneficial aside.
 
What is the main shortcoming of the today’s women?
Sarah Palin.
 
Few words to describe how should be a woman in 2010
Educated. Informed. Critical thinker. Know who you are before you get married. Establish yourself before you have children. Read, read, read. Then read some more. And sewing is a very fun hobby.
 
One city where to live and work?
In my dreams, Rome or New York. 
 
Who would you like to thank to have helped you becoming the person and writer you became?
Everyone and anyone who ever read any of my books.
 
Describe yourself in 3 adjectives and 3 faults?
Alive; accidental; ordinary.
Three faults:
Poor singing voice; ankles swell after flying; my car smells bad. I can’t figure out why.
 
 
Talking about “Autobiography of a Fat Bride”…
 
How did you get the idea to write this book? What inspired you?
It was a natural progression after writing Idiot Girls’ Action-Adventure Club, which were stories about me being single and a little wild. The next step, as in real life, was a book about getting married, although some things still stayed wild.
 
How is talking personally about yourself and your life in a book?
It seems like I’ve always done it, and I sort of have a disconnect between writing these things down and believing that anybody is going to read it. It doesn’t bother me, it’s a very necessary portion of telling the story. And if I can make anybody feel better about themselves by admitting something terribly embarrassing about myself, I’m game. If I can make them laugh at the same time, I couldn’t be happier. So I get something for releasing my secrets, you know?
 
What was the reaction of your family/husband/cat..
My husband is a very good sport, but the cat was not. He peed on a sweater I left on the floor and stamped my pillow with his butt. I think he paid another cat with stronger back legs to pee in my car, but I can’t prove it.
No one really has an issue with anything I write but my mother, and I told her that if she wanted me to stop writing about her, she’d have to stop talking. Every time she opens her mouth, something hysterical falls out, even if she doesn’t mean it or understand it. Every time I see her, I come away with a story. She simply can’t help herself, and neither can I. J
 
How do you relate with your fans? How do you manage having so many people knowing about your private life?
People who read my books, I think, are a lot like me. They’re people who I would hang out with, people who I would be friends with, people who “get” things in the same way I “get” them. So I feel that no one who knows something about me is a stranger, just maybe a friend I haven’t met yet. When I get to go on book tours and have readings, it’s just like a big party. People make friends with one another, and I make friends, too. There are quite a few people that I keep in touch with on a regular basis that I met at those readings. I love it. I don’t think anyone could ever have a better job.
 
 
Tag:  Laurie Notaro, E' il giorno del giudizio e non ho niente da mettermi, Edizioni Piemme, ironia,

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